Category Archives: Stories

Celebrating the World of Dumplings

As one of the most beloved food in the world, dumplings are universally enjoyed. Last week I had an opportunity to have great fun by spending an afternoon celebrating their goodness at the 12th Annual Chef One NYC Dumpling Festival. A wide variety of dumplings including Latin empanadas, Polish pierogies, Italian ravioli and Asian offerings with fillings from Korean, Japanese and Chinese cuisines were all offered for sampling. (As a disclosure I am paid to write this sponsored post.) I managed to eat too much that went beyond just sampling. But I was stuffing myself for a good cause. All of the proceeds go to support the Food Bank for New York City to provide hunger-relief.

Here Comes da Dumpling Judge

How to celebrate the First Annual “National Dumpling Day” was a problem until I was invited to be a guest judge for the 12th Annual Chef One Dumpling Eating Contest, which is one of the highlights of the 2015 Chef One NYC Dumpling Festival. This year’s festival will be held from noon to 5pm on September 26th in Manhattan’s Sara D. Roosevelt Park (at Houston Street next to the Bowery branch of Whole Foods).

We Have a Winner!

Diana Kuan's The Chinese Takeout Cookbook

As promised I have randomly selected a winner, or rather Warren did, for Diana Kaun’s new book The Chinese Takeout Cookbook. The winner is “gryhndldy.” Let me congratulate “gryhndldy” and I will be contacting you for your mailing information. Diana’s book is a wonderful collection of classic Chinese takeout recipes that you can reproduce at home. Diana’s recipes are easy to follow and use ingredients readily available in your local markets. For those who did not win the book go out and buy a copy. Make takeout Chinese food you can enjoy while controlling the quality of the ingredients, and not worrying about whether your neighborhood restaurant slipped in some MSG unannounced.

New Year, New Determination

Testing Recipes

The last six months of 2012 passed by me stealthily without my realizing it. The new year is here and I find I have neglected Red Cook during those months. But I’ve not abandoned Red Cook, so the report of Red Cook’s death was an exaggeration. With another Chinese New Year coming up, I am determined to restart my blogging effort. Please accept my apology for this interruption and I hope to engage you in Chinese cooking once again.

A Lobster Feast Fit for Welcoming the Dragon Year

Juggling consulting work at Lotus Blue and other freelance consulting gigs, I almost neglected my own family’s reunion dinner for Chinese New Year. But since we were entering the Chinese zodiac’s dragon year it would have been improper not to have a grand celebration to welcome it. Among the flurry of my activities I staged a sumptuous Dragon Chinese New Year banquet for a small group of family and friends.

World Journal Profile

Last Thursday there was a two-inch red headline in the World Journal (世界日報) profiling me and my culinary endeavors. I was very excited by this coverage. Through the Culinary Historian of New York I was invited this past March to participate in a panel discussion on “Chinese Food in America Today.” During the event I met a reporter from World Journal, the largest Chinese language … Continue reading World Journal Profile »

Help Haiti

Photo: U.S. Department of Defense It is catastrophic when natural disaster hits a country, but it’s tragic when that country is already struggling to rebuild from decades of political and civic strife. The earthquake in Haiti last week devastated the citizens and physical structures of the country as well as its psychic. It is imperative that we all rally to help the survivors rebuild their … Continue reading Help Haiti »

Save Your Favorite Red Cook Recipes on Springpad

Red Cook on springpad

springpad Beta Logo

You’re reading your favorite blog and you found a recipe you’d like to try in the future. You bookmark it in your browser, or print it out. But before you know it your bookmarks are out of control or your printed recipe is lost among your pile of bills. Now you can collect them all in one place. Red Cook along with many other prominent bloggers have joined springpad to let you collect your recipes in one place. You can also share your own recipes with other members in the springpad community.

Andrew Coe – The Interview

Andrew Coe

A few days ago I talked with Andrew Coe about his recently published book Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States. Coe has created a scholarly work with extensive research and fascinating findings, enlivened by entertaining narratives and anecdotes. Yesterday I posted my impressions and reactions to some of the findings in the book, today I’d like to share with you highlights of my conversation with him.

Andrew Coe Explains American Chinese Food

Chop Suey Book Cover

Like many immigrants to America I constantly search for food of my homeland. This search continues even now after more than thirty years. When I first arrived in the U.S. during the 1970’s the most common Chinese food was still chop suey. I remember being horrified when I was served chop suey as Chinese food at my college dormitory. Not only was it unrecognizable, but also tasted positively vile. I wondered how Chinese food had turned into this mess. Chop Suey: a Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States, a new book by Andrew Coe, helps answer this question.