Category Archives: Vegetarian

Refreshingly Cool Mango Pudding

Mango Pudding

Located virtually on the equator, Singapore offers a wide variety of fresh fruits year round. Although many tropical fruits are harvested year round, a small number of them are seasonal. When I lived in Singapore I used to follow these seasonal fruits like people in temperate climates follow changing season. Among the seasonal fruits, mango is the one I always eagerly anticipated. Its season starts at the end of the dry months, which is around July. Local mangoes start appearing in the market around August and continue to be available through October.

Also posted in Recipes, Sweet Dishes | Tagged | 33 Responses

Stir-fry Fortnight III – Plain Veggie Stir-fry

Garlic Stir-fry Pea Shoots

Garlic Stir-fry Pea Shoots

We take for granted that stir-frying is just combining a bunch of ingredients, frying them in a wok, and seasoning them appropriately; that is partially accurate. What is rarely understood is that there are variations in stir-frying technique. Broadly classified the variations are 1) plain stir-fry (清炒 or QingChao), 2) moist stir-fry (滑炒 or HuaChao) and 3) dry wok stir-fry (煸炒 or BianChao). In this third part of Stir-fry Fortnight series post let me show you how simple it is to make plain vegetable stir-fry.

Also posted in Plain Stir-fry (清炒), Recipes, Techniques, Vegetables | Tagged | Series: | 5 Responses

Bloomin’ Chinese Chives

Stir-fry Chinese Chive Blossoms and Tofu

Stir-fry Chinese Chive Blossoms and Tofu
Photography by Ron Boszko

When I was growing up I hated the smell and taste of chives, specifically Chinese chives. I remembered encountering Chinese chives in stir-fries with ground pork or shrimp, or sprinkled on top of steamed rice cake. I would always pick the chives off carefully before eating. I do not recall when it was that my palate changed and I began to enjoy Chinese chives. Now I don’t just enjoy them; I adore them.

Also posted in Dry Wok Stir-fry (煸炒), Recipes, Techniques, Vegetables | 6 Responses

First Full Moon and Tangyuan

Sesame Tangyuan in Peanut Broth

Sesame Tangyuan in Peanut Broth

We braved the subzero temperatures last Wednesday night to view the lunar eclipse. It was too cold to spend much time outside, but we managed to witness the beautiful red moon at its peak. This beautiful sight made me ponder the moon’s place in Chinese traditions and lore. The moon’s round shape is very appealing to the Chinese and variously symbolizes harmony, fulfillment and reunion. And the Yuanxiao (元宵節) festival, which marks the end of The Chinese New Year’s festivities and celebrates the first full moon of the new year, would be celebrated the very next day.

Also posted in Recipes, Sweet Dishes | 1 Response

Pretty Pink for Valentine’s Day

Sweet and Sour Radish Salad

Watermelon Radishes

Valentine’s Day is not a Chinese tradition, but young Chinese are taking in droves to emulate Western culture by celebrating love every year on the 14th of February. Yet the divorce rate in China is also rising precariously. Is there a correlation here? I will let the sociologist research this problem to their hearts content. I am however more interested in what are the options for a Chinese cook to celebrate this bourgeois decadent Western festival. Read what I’d serve for this Valentine’s Day.

Also posted in Cold Dishes, Recipes, Vegetables | Tagged | 7 Responses
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